Through a lens

Scott Adams on systems instead of goals:

If you do something every day, it’s a system. If you’re waiting to achieve it someday in the future, it’s a goal. …

[O]ne should have a system instead of a goal. The system-versus-goals model can be applied to most human endeavours. In the world of dieting, losing twenty pounds is a goal, but eating right is a system. In the exercise realm, running a marathon in under four hours is a goal, but exercising daily is a system. In business, making a million dollars is a goal, but being a serial entrepreneur is a system. …

Goal-oriented people exist in a state of continuous pre-success failure at best, and permanent failure at worst if things never work out. Systems people succeed every time they apply their systems, in the sense that they did what they intended to do. The goals people are fighting the feeling of discouragement at each turn. The systems people are feeling good every time they apply their system. That’s a big difference in terms of maintaining your personal energy in the right direction. …

Nearly 1 percent of young women in a U.S. study who have become pregnant claim to have done so as virgins, according to a report in the Christmas edition of Britain’s BMJ medical journal.

Stock-Sanford Corollary to Parkinson’s Law: If you wait until the last minute, it only takes a minute to do.
Wallace pledged to protect segregation. Only 50 years ago. He failed. But in his failure, he invented most of the language that is chillingly contemporary today in resenting the government and the political activity that forced about these changes for equal citizenship through the doorway of race and then opening up to everybody else. … He talked about pointy-headed bureaucrats in Washington telling you how to run your business, and where you had to send your children to school. And that they were in cahoots with a biased national media that had a racial agenda. Whose effective goal was to concentrate all … power in the central government in Washington. That language is contemporary. It’s the language of “government is bad.”
(via 22 Maps That Show The Deepest Linguistic Conflicts In America - Business Insider)
But you can confuse your Philly-born pals by getting them to read this list: bat, bad, sat, sad, mat, mad, mash, grad, path, grab, pat, pad, glad, pass, laugh, bath, past, calf, badge, jazz,jam, ham, bag, bang, began, fad, mad, dad.
Phillyspeak
Marie Curie’s academic timeline (from the Curie Museum):
1903: finished PhD, won first Nobel prize
1906: appointed chaired professor in physics at the Sorbonne
1911: won second Nobel prize

Marie Curie’s academic timeline (from the Curie Museum):

  • 1903: finished PhD, won first Nobel prize
  • 1906: appointed chaired professor in physics at the Sorbonne
  • 1911: won second Nobel prize
And of course motorcycles by their very nature are more dangerous than automobiles. In 2010, 4,502 U.S. riders were killed in accidents, meaning that motorcycles accounted for 14 percent of traffic fatalities but less than one percent of vehicle miles traveled. Many of these deaths for practical purposes were self-inflicted — of the 14,000-plus cyclists killed from 2008 to 2010, 42 percent weren’t wearing a helmet.

It would make sense to me if birds’ vestibular systems were adapted to sense magnetic fields for navigation.  Imagine if your inner ear was sensitive to not only accelerations but also absolute (magnetic) heading.

(via In U.S., 46% Hold Creationist View of Human Origins)